Lessons Learned from a Victorian Police Officer Charged for Violent Assault

24/01/2022

A police officer of the Victorian Police Service has been charged with recklessly causing injury and unlawful assault after a member of the public was violently thrown to the ground, leaving him in a pool of blood and urine. The member of the public was approached from behind, and the officer threw him to the ground with such force that his feet flew up in the air. The force that the officer used was so severe that he left the victim with a ruptured spleen, a fractured jaw, and a fractured ankle.

Officer charged for beating.

Police officers are employed to protect citizens from the criminal element. However, when a police officer is charged and arrested for a brutal assault, not only have they taken their job to the extreme, more importantly they have broken the trust that is vested in them by the public.

There is no doubt that the officer involved in this case was out of line, but the question is why did they do it?

For one, it could have been out of anger, frustration, or fear. It could have been a lack of training. It could also have been some other psychological issue he were experiencing. All of these reasons could have led to the officer becoming angry and violent.

Another reason could have been that the officer was a bully and took pleasure in punishing the person they had targeted. Psychopaths sit on both sides of the law. Regardless of the reason, the officer has now been charged and faces a maximum prison sentence of 3 years. All considered, a pretty light sentence.

Battleground Melbourne Police Brutality
Photo by Mitchell Luo on Unsplash

What to do if you're approached by a police officer?

If you're approached by the police, it's important to understand what's happening. This can be incredibly difficult when they approach you from behind.

In a typical situation, you are best to not make a move or say anything until you're told to do so. In the situation where this police officer has been charged, there was no verbal warning, no auditory communication of any kind whatsoever, so that general rule couldn’t apply. When you are addressed by a police officer that identifies themselves, it's important to remember that even though you may be dealing with a police officer, you don't have to answer to them. If you're approached by a police officer and you feel like they're being aggressive, you can still ask for their name, badge number and station. If you're being physically assaulted, in so far as possible, make sure to take note of where each officer is during the assault.

If able, take down their number if you have a phone on you. Photogragh and video record as much as possible. It may be the difference between you getting justice or the bad cop getting off to do it again. Also keep in mind that you are not obligated to answer questions about anything that happened earlier that day.

What to do if you're in a situation where you feel threatened?

The police officer who was charged over the brutal attack that left a member of the public in a pool of blood and urine has been suspended without pay by the Victorian Police Service. The individual was charged with recklessly causing injury and unlawful assault. The assault happened in a railway station forecourt in Victoria, Australia. The man was approached by an officer from behind and was violently thrown to the ground by the now suspended and charged police officer.

You should always speak to a good lawyer before deciding to do anything. If you don’t have a (good) lawyer, look on Telegram groups, social networks like Gab.com often have people who can make recommendations, as well as other truth and freedom platforms, respectively truth and freedom groups within the mainstream social media such as Facebook (Meta).

If you feel unsafe, you should call the emergency services number. If you decide that you want to take action, direct all actions and activities through your lawyer. Colleagues of the corrupt officer may try to intimidate you and you need people in your corner to have your back.

What are your rights in a situation with a violent police officer?

If you are a member of the public and you are approached by a police officer, what are your rights? There are many rights that a police officer is supposed to uphold, but unfortunately not all officers uphold them. If you find yourself in a situation where you feel a police officer has violated your rights, you can report them, and the police force or police service is obliged to investigate. If the police force does not investigate the police officer and takes no action, you can take your complaint to the regulatory authority in your state (or country).

As a member of the public, you have the right to expect your safety and the safety of those around you. Unfortunately, a police officer who has sworn to protect and serve can sometimes put your safety at risk. If you are in a situation with a police officer and you feel you have been assaulted, then you have a right to contact someone. It is important that you have a witness or recording of what has happened. It is also important that you get medical attention and images of any injuries. The same thing goes for a normal assault only when the person who assaulted you is a police officer you need to have as much as physically possible because the path to justice will be a lot tougher.

Conclusion: There is no excuse for this kind of behaviour.

In a recent case, a police officer has been charged with recklessly causing injury and unlawful assault. The police officer approached the member of the public from behind and violently threw him to the ground, leaving him in a pool of blood and urine. The police officer left the man in a motionless heap on the ground. The man sustained multiple injuries, including a fracture to his front jaw and a fractured rib and ankle. The police officer has been charged for the assault and is due to appear in court as a the time of writing.

Other News

The Australian federal government can't budget enough funding for all state programs.

Treasurer Josh Frydenberg warns states never to count on the federal government to help them recover from the Omicron wave. This means states now have to take greater responsibility and do the heavy lifting that the federal government has largely been doing throughout the global SARS-CoV-2 pandemic.

Read More
Sydney financier Ian Lazar exonerated in fraud case

A long list of failed prosecutions is becoming increasingly longer with the latest case against Ian David Lazar. The court granted costs against the office of the Director of Public Prosecutions (ODPP) in favour of Ian Lazar.

Read More
Fauci secretly met with scientists on a teleconference and knew about the origins of COVID from a lab.

The director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Dr. Anthony Fauci, reportedly believed after an undisclosed meeting that the CCP Virus might have come from a U.S. lab, but still pushed the idea that the virus had come naturally

Read More
1 2 3
linkedin facebook pinterest youtube rss twitter instagram facebook-blank rss-blank linkedin-blank pinterest youtube twitter instagram